Photo of Jan Herfkens

Jan Herfkens is an associate in the Amsterdam real estate practice of Greenberg Traurig. Jan focuses his practice on real estate, administrative law, and environmental law. Jan holds a LL.M. from Leiden University. Besides his bachelor of Law, Jan studied Middle-Eastern Studies: Arabic, and he worked as a student-assistant for international labor law. Before joining Greenberg Traurig in October 2019, Jan was a trainee of political affairs at the Dutch Embassy in Beirut (Lebanon), and he was a lecturer on “Techniques and Methods of Jurisprudence” at Leiden University. Jan is admitted to the Amsterdam Bar.

As of Jan. 1, 2021, all permit applications for new buildings in the Netherlands are being tested against new criteria which aim to ensure that these new buildings are (almost)
Continue Reading Every New Building in the Netherlands Must Be (Almost) Energy Neutral Starting Jan. 1, 2021

On Oct. 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy (Ministerie van Economische
Continue Reading U.S. and Dutch Governments Announce Hydrogen Collaboration

On 10 June 2020, the German government published its long-awaited national hydrogen agenda. Earlier, the Dutch government also published its own hydrogen agenda and the policy overlap is clear: as
Continue Reading German and Dutch National Agendas Indicate Further Focus on and Investments in Hydrogen

On 1 April 2020 the Dutch minister for Environment and Housing (Minister voor Milieu en Wonen) announced that implementation of the Environment and Planning Act is postponed. Implementation of the


Continue Reading Implementation of the Dutch Environment and Planning Act (Omgevingswet) Postponed Due to Pandemic

On 20 December 2019 the Dutch Supreme Court delivered its judgment in the case of Urgenda against the Dutch State. In 2013, the NGO Urgenda started a civil law procedure against the Dutch State for “knowingly exposing its own citizens to danger” by not taking sufficient measures to prevent climate change and therefore not preventing the foreseeable harm caused by climate change. The Dutch government acknowledged the potentially harmful consequences of climate change, but argued it could not be ordered to act via a court procedure.
Continue Reading The Dutch Supreme Court Obliges the Dutch Government to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions